Ages of man humpen

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Object Name: 
Ages of man humpen
Place Made: 
Accession Number: 
57.3.86
Dimensions: 
H: 27.2 cm; D (rim): 11.3 cm, (foot ring): 12.4 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
possibly 1500-possibly 1699
Credit Line: 
Gift of Edwin J. Beinecke
Primary Description: 
Clear glass with minute bubbles and impurities and grey tinge; free-blown, enameled and gilded. Almost cylindrical body with pushed up base having rough pontil mark, applied foot ring; enamel decoration: the object is divided in two zones, each subdivided in upright rectangles framed by yellow and red lines, the uprights having capital-like horizontals supporting ribbon arcades bearing inscriptions; each rectangle contains in multi- colored enamel, the full-length figure of a male, symbolizing the different stages in the life of a man starting with a ten year old child and ending with an one hundred year old man, all accompanied by symbols of their age; the inscriptions are as follows: 10 IAR EIN KINDT; 20 IAR EIN MAN; 40 IAR WOLGETHAN; 50 IAR STILLE STAN; 60 IAR GEHTS ALTER AN; 70 IAR EIN GREIS; 80 IAR NIMMER WEIS; 90 IAR DER KINDER SPOT; 100 IAR GENAD DER GOT"; below rim a gilded band (partly rubbed off), studded with green beads as well as diagonally oriented paralleled lines of white and red beads, above a single red line, and a circlet of white lily-of-the-valley blossoms; on the base in white an old catalogue number: "F.386" as well as a paper label with the number "309"; in the panel which includes the boy of ten the date "1578" is painted in red.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Beinecke, Edwin J. (d. 1957), Source
Renaissance Remix: Art and Imagination in 16th-Century Europe
Venue(s)
Memorial Art Gallery of The University of Rochester 2012-07 through 2016-07
See the world of the Renaissance through the eyes of a young boy growing up in mid 16th-century Europe—a time of political, cultural, religious and social change. Imagine that your world has been transformed by the invention of the printing press, the “discovery” of the New World, and a widespread explosion of intellectual and artistic energy. At the center of this long-term installation is MAG’s much-loved Portrait of a Boy of the Bracciforte Family, but it also showcases 30 other works from the Gallery’s collection, the Metropolitan Museum and the Corning Museum of Glass. Hands-on activities, videos, touch screen displays and listening posts explore the Renaissance “spirit of change” through five major themes—portraiture, arms and armor, music, worldly goods, and the power of the press.