Light Shade with a View of Tivoli

Object Name: 
Light Shade with a View of Tivoli

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Object Name: 
Light Shade with a View of Tivoli
Place Made: 
Accession Number: 
2003.3.33
Dimensions: 
Overall H (max, adjustable): 54.2 cm, W: 24.8 cm, D: 12.7 cm; a) shade H: 22 cm, W: 21.6 cm
Location: 
Not on Display
Date: 
about 1835
Web Description: 
In 1767, the great antiquarian William Hamilton acquired a light shade with a transparent painted glass screen depicting the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. A flickering candle placed behind the light shade produced a lively image of this dramatic Italian landscape. Even master painters, such as Turner, Friedrich, and Gainsborough, painted similar light shades in transparent enamels. This colorful screen is a typical example of the way in which members of the middle class sought to bring the romance of art and travel into their drawing rooms. The light shade's transparent enameled plaque is decorated with a view of Tivoli showing the Teverone River, the ruins of the Roman statesman Gaius Maecenas's villa, and the Sabine Hills. This area near Rome was one of Italy's most popular tourist attractions in the early 19th century. The glass pane, which was probably decorated after a print, is removable. It may have been replaced with a pane showing a different scene, possibly another Italian view.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Glassgallery Michael Kovacek, Former Collection
2003-02-13
Color: 
Technique: 
Inscription: 
M. Finsch
signature
lower left corner
Primary Description: 
Colorless glass, enameled; wood, paint. Flat square panel of glass that has view of Tivoli painted on it. Panel sits within a black frame on a pedestal.