Jacobite “Amen” Glass

Object Name: 
Jacobite “Amen” Glass

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Object Name: 
Jacobite “Amen” Glass
Place Made: 
Accession Number: 
79.2.35
Dimensions: 
Overall H: 21.8 cm; Rim Diam: 11.5 cm
Location: 
On Display
Date: 
1749
Credit Line: 
Bequest of Jerome Strauss
Web Description: 
The term Jacobite derives from “Jacobus”, Latin for “James”. It was used to describe supporters of the exiled British king, James II (father of Queen Anne), and his descendents.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Strauss, Jerome (1893-1978), Source
1979-03-22
Berney, George F., Former Collection
Mesham, Col., Former Collection
Category: 
Color: 
Material: 
Inscription: 
17 / 49
Date
scratch-engraved on bowl
To His Royal Highness / PRINCE HENRY / Duke of Albany & York
Inscription
scratch-engraved on bowl
AMEN
Inscription
scratch-engraved on bowl
God Save The King I pray / God Bliss The King I pray / GOD SAVE / THE KING / Send Him Victorious / Happy and Glorious / Soon to Reign / Over Us / God Save/ The King.
Inscription
scratch-engraved on bowl
God Bliss The Prince of Wales / The True-born Prince of Wales / Sent Us by Thee: / Grant us one Favour more / The King for to Resotre / As Thou hast done before / THE FAMILIE
Inscription
scratch-engraved on bowl
God Save the Church I pray / And Bliss The Church I pray / Pure to Remain / Against all Heresie / And Whigs Hypocrasie / Who strive maliciouslie / Her to Defame
Inscription
scratch-engraved on bowl
God Bliss the Subjects all / And save both Great and Small / In every Station / That will bring home The King / Who hath best Right to Reign / It is the only Things/ Can Save the Nation
Inscription
scratch-engraved on bowl
JR8
Monogram
scratch-engraved on bowl
Primary Description: 
Jacobite “Amen” Glass. Colorless lead glass; blown and diamond-point (scratch) engraved. Large trumpet-shaped bowl, on heavy drawn straight stem with air bubble near the base of the bowl; the bowl scratch-engraved, with a crown above the mirror monogram "JR8"; "AMEN" in an interlaced frame below; interlaced borders frame lengthy inscriptions on the remainder of the bowl with an inscription on the obverse, divided by the crown and monogram: "God Save The King I pray / God Bliss The King I pray / GOD SAVE / THE KING / Send Him Victorious / Happy and Glorious / Soom to Reign / Over Us / God Save / The King."; and continuing in separately framed areas around the remainder of the bowl "God Bliss The Prince of Wales / The True-born Prince of Wales / Sent Us by Thee: / Grant us one Favour more / The King for to Restore / As Thou hast done before / THE FAMILIE."; "To His Royal Highness / PRINCE HENRY / Duke of Albany & York."; and below "God Save the Church I pray / And Bliss The Church I pray / Pure to Remain / Against all Heresie / And Whigs Hypocrasie / Who strive maliciouslie / Her to Defame."; and "God Bliss the Subjects all / And save both Great and Small / In every Station / That will bring home The King / Who hath best Right to Reign / It is the only Thing / Can Save the Nation."; dated "17 / 49" below the panel inscribed "AMEN"; conical foot; rough pontil mark.
In Sparkling Company: Glass and Social Life in Britain during the 1700s
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2021-05 through 2022-01-02
In 2020, the Corning Museum of Glass (CMoG) will present In Sparkling Company: Glass and Social Life in Britain during the 1700s; an exhibition exploring the role of glass, light and reflectivity in eighteenth-century social life. In the 1700s, Britain was a vibrant and commercial nation. Its growing cities were hubs of sociability, scientific advancement, trade, and finance. From glittering costume and elaborately presented confectionery, to polished mirrors and dazzling chandeliers, glass helped define the social rituals and cultural values of the period. While new innovations in glass delighted the wealthy, the material also bore witness to the ambitions of colonization and the horrors of the African slave trade. Glass beads were traded for human lives and elegant glass dishes, baskets and bowls held sweet delicacies made with sugar produced by enslaved labor. Underpinning Britain’s prosperity were aggressive foreign trade policies, colonization and a far-reaching economy of enslavement, the profits of which funded the pleasures and innovations of the fashionable world. Beginning in the intimate setting of a private dressing room, with a magnificent silver gilt dressing service made for the Duchess of Portland in about 1700, learn about how the elite prepared themselves for a night of revelry and entertainment. See the dazzling clothes and accessories worn by the ‘polished’ individual and understand the rules that governed how they behaved. Enter a specially commissioned virtual reality reconstruction of the remarkable and innovative glass-paneled drawing room designed for the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland in 1775, an interior that hasn’t been seen for nearly 200 years. Become immersed in the glittering nightlife of British elite and feel the tension between the exuberance of the fashionable world and the human cost of such sparkling company. Through a lens of glass, see what it meant to be ‘modern’ in the 1700s, and what it cost.
A Connoisseur's Guide to Antique Glass (1999) illustrated, p. 56; BIB# 67965
English Glass from the Strauss Collection (1980-04) illustrated, pp. 311, 313, fig. 5; BIB# AI7962
Investing in Georgian Glass (1971) p. 130, top; BIB# 74772
Collecting Georgian Glass (1971) p. 130, top; BIB# 87457
Investing in Georgian Glass (1969) p. 130, top; BIB# 27206
Glass Drinking Vessels in the Collection of Jerome Strauss (1957) pp. 44-45, fig. 47a; BIB# AI55441
Glass Drinking Vessels (1942) pp. 47-51;
Glassmaking History in Drinking Vessels (1941-08) p. 80;
A Catalogue of Old English and other glassware (1937) p. 66, pl. 8, #530; BIB# 29807