Wineglass

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Object Name: 
Wineglass
Place Made: 
Accession Number: 
79.3.791
Dimensions: 
H: 12.2 cm; Rim Diam: 6.2 cm; Foot Diam: 6.5 cm
Location: 
On Display
Date: 
1700-1799
Credit Line: 
Bequest of Jerome Strauss
Primary Description: 
Wineglass. Colorless glass; pattern molded. Colorless glass, bell-shaped bowl, pattern molded, swirl ribbed, hollow baluster stem, slightly conical foot.
Department: 
Provenance: 
Strauss, Jerome (1893-1978), Source
1979
Color: 
Technique: 
Material: 
Fire and Vine: The Story of Glass and Wine
Venue(s)
Corning Museum of Glass 2021-07-03 through 2022-12-31
Explore the many ways glass touches wine as it travels from the grape to your goblet in Fire and Vine: The Story of Glass and Wine. The entwined histories of glass and wine extend back thousands of years, from lavish feasts of ancient Rome, to the polite society of Britain in the 1700s, to formal dinner parties of post-war America, to an essential experience within our contemporary food culture. The strength, impermeability, and versatility of glass has played an important role in every step of wine’s journey, from the production, distribution, sale, and ultimately the enjoyment of this intoxicating beverage. During your visit, you’ll see a rare 2,000-year-old fragment of cameo glass depicting a grape harvest, a still-sealed bottle of wine found in a shipwreck off the coast of England, and an exceptional 400-year-old document describing an “almost unbreakable glass jar” that could prevent wine from spoiling. A focal point of the exhibition will be a dense display of dozens of wine glasses from around the world, representing many styles and tastes, fit for a variety of occasions. You will be able to envision the stories behind the glasses—and imagine yourself partaking from this delicate stemware that’s been part of countless life moments. In the exhibition, you'll also explore how the story of glass and wine has particular relevance in the Finger Lakes of New York State, which has been a nexus for both the glass and wine industries for more than 150 years. Independent, entrepreneurial winemakers and glass artists have found a mutual home in this region, building on historical tradition with new creative energy that makes Corning and the Finger Lakes an international hub for the entwined industries of fire and vine.
Savour: Food Culture in the Age of Enlightenment
Venue(s)
Gardiner Museum 2019-10-17 through 2020-01-19
Wadsworth Atheneum 2020-03-07 through 2021-01-03
Food and dining were transformed in Europe during the age of Enlightenment by profound changes that still resonate today. What many of us eat, the way food is cooked, and how we dine continues to be influenced by radical changes that occurred in France from 1650 until the French Revolution in 1789. Savour: Food Culture in the Age of Englightenment explores the story of this transformation with rare objects, fascinating histories, and amusing stories. We start in the kitchen gardens at Versailles where advances in horticulture expanded the growing seasons of vegetables and fruits, making a greater selection of foods available year-round. Then we visit the steamy kitchens of cooks who advocated light, flavourful cuisine centuries before our times. Next, we discover surprisingly modern philosophies for healthy eating and vegetarianism, and join ardent foodies as they savour meals served on newly invented ceramic and silver wares, from sauceboats to tureens. Along the way, we explore how social changes were impacting eating then, just as now, as the grand formality of the past was abandoned in favour of informality and intimacy. Savour: Food Culture in the Age of Enlightenment is organized by the Gardiner Museum and curated by Meredith Chilton, C.M., Curator Emerita. Works of art and objects from major North American museums and private collections, as well as key pieces of contemporary ceramics and knitted art, will come together in a delectable feast for the senses designed by Opera Atelier’s Resident Set Designer, Gerard Gauci. After the Gardiner Museum, the exhibition will tour to the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut. The exhibition is accompanied by a cookbook title The King’s Peas: Delectable Recipes and their Stories from the Age of Enlightenment by Meredith Chilton, with contributions by Markus Bestig, Executive Chef, The York Club, Toronto.