All About Glass

All About Glass

This is your resource for exploring various topics in glass: delve deeper with this collection of articles, multimedia, and virtual books all about glass. Content is frequently added to the area, so check back for new items. If you have a topic you'd like to see covered, send us your suggestion. If you have a specific question, Ask a Glass Question at our Rakow Research Library.

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Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Decorated Peachblow Footed Vase
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Mt. Washington Glass Company United States, New Bedford, MA 1886–1890 Lead glass, enamel, gilding; blown, applied, enameled Overall H: 16.4 cm, W: 12 cm (2002.4.39) Peachblow glass, another Art Glass, was made contemporaneously with Burmese glass, though it had a different chemical composition and

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Royal Flemish Vase with Camel and Rider
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Mt. Washington Glass Company United States, New Bedford, MA 1893–1895 Glass and pigments Overall H: 32.9 cm, Diam (Max): 16.8 cm (L.40.4.2002) Another type of decorated glass made by Mt. Washington in the 1880s was called Royal Flemish glass. The decoration had nothing to do with the province of

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Royal Flemish Punch Bowl with Brownie Decoration
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Mt. Washington Glass Company United States, New Bedford, MA 1894–1896 Colorless glass, blown, enameled, gilded H: 34.4 cm, D: 40.7 cm (L.23.4.2011) One unusual decoration on Mt. Washington glass depicts Brownie figures. These figures were created by the author/illustrator Palmer Cox. Brownies were

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Cut Lamp with Silver Fittings
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Pairpoint Manufacturing Co.; Mt. Washington Glass Company United States, New Bedford, MA 1880–1900 Glass, silver; blown, cut Overall H: 52.8 cm, W: 29.1 cm, Diam (max): 20.4 cm (2004.4.57) The Mt. Washington Glass Company produced cut glass from the middle of the 19th century; its exhibit at the

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Water Carafe, cut in Wheeler pattern
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Mt. Washington Glass Company; Henry Wilde United States, New Bedford, MA about 1890–1910 Lead glass, blown and cut H: 20.9 cm, D: 15.3 cm (92.4.9) This water carafe is cut in the Wheeler pattern, which originated around 1885. This pattern was made until the turn of the century in a variety of

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Dish
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Pairpoint Corporation United States, New Bedford, MA About 1909–1930 Glass, blown, cut Overall H: 3.8 cm, Diam: 15.1 cm (L.100.4.2010) This and other Pairpoint Corporation floral patterns were popular. They were much simpler than the elaborate cut glass that had been in production since the 1880s.

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Kerosene Lamp
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Pairpoint Manufacturing Co. United States, New Bedford, MA About 1900–1903 Glass, enamel, gilding, metal; blown, enameled, gilt, assembled Overall H: 42.8 cm, Diam: 21.2 cm (L.251.4.2010) From the 1870s onward, lighting was a major product of Mt. Washington and, eventually, of the Pairpoint

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: “Puffy” Table Lamp
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Pairpoint Corporation United States, New Bedford, MA 1907 Lead glass, bronze; mold-blown, enameled H: 53.6 cm; (a) H: 44.2 cm, D: 26.2 cm; (b) H: 15.5 cm, D: 32 cm (92.4.15) After 1900, the Pairpoint Corporation greatly increased their production of lamps, most of which were electric after 1902.

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Butterfly Table Lamp
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Pairpoint Corporation United States, New Bedford, MA 1907–1925 Glass, metal, enamel, rubber; blown, tooled, enameled, acid-etched, assembled Overall H: 52.6 cm, Diam: 37.5 cm (2009.4.338) Pairpoint made electric lamps, like this one, with reverse-painted shades and a variety of metal bases from

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Electric Table Lamp
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Pairpoint Corporation United States, New Bedford, MA About 1915–1937 Glass, metal, fabric, paper, marble, electrical wiring/components; tooled and cast glass, assembled Overall H: 34.3 cm, W: 20.4 cm, D: 10.2 cm (L.124.4.2010) This candlestick lamp is one of a number of designs of electric

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Ambero Glass Vase
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Pairpoint Corporation United States, New Bedford, MA 1915–1916 Glass, metal, enamel; blown, tooled, acid-etched, enameled Overall H: 37 cm, Diam: 21.6 cm (2009.4.340) Ambero Art Glass is relatively rare because it was only made for two or three years. This glass was enameled on the inside surface

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Covered Engraved Dish
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Pairpoint Corporation United States, New Bedford, MA 1925–1937 Glass, blown, cased, applied, engraved Overall H: 20 cm, Diam: 24.2 cm (2009.4.93) In the 1920s, the Pairpoint Corporation made a variety of tableware, both colored and colorless, much of it with engraved and/or cut decoration. This

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Crown Milano Bowl on Stand
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Mt. Washington Glass Company United States, New Bedford, MA 1891–1895 Glass, enamel; blown, enamel decoration Overall H: 25.4 cm, W (max): 45.5 cm, Bowl W: 20.8 cm (63.4.121) Crown Milano glass was another successful type of Mt. Washington’s Art Glass. This Crown Milano bowl sits on a Pairpoint

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: Tazza
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Pairpoint Corporation United States, New Bedford, MA 1925–1937 Lead glass, blown and engraved H: 21.9 cm, Diam (rim): 21.8 cm (75.4.49) Pairpoint’s Fine Arts Line was in production from 1925 until the company closed for the first time in 1937. Many pieces combine marble and silver mounts. Gift of

Meet the Artist: Jiří Harcuba & April Surgent
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Corning Museum of Glass, June 24, 2010 Tina Oldknow:  Thank you all very much for coming out tonight.  I think many of you will remember the snowstorm that you braved to hear Dante Marioni speak last February. Tonight is a thunderstorm that heralds the “Meet The Artist” lecture, which will be

Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: American Glass from the Gilded Age to the Roaring Twenties
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This exhibition is entitled, “Mt. Washington and Pairpoint: American Glass from the %%Gilded%% Age to the Roaring Twenties.” The Mt. Washington Glass Company and its successor, the Pairpoint Corporation, were in existence for 100 years, from 1837 until 1938. Together, they created a large variety

Meet the Artist: Toots Zynsky
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Toots Zynsky builds amorphous, glass vessels that defy categorization, her objects inhabiting a region where painting, sculpture, and the decorative arts meet. In this interview, Zynsky discusses the early days of the American studio glass movement when she was a student of Dale Chihuly’s at the

Meet the Artist: Lino Tagliapietra
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Lino Tagliapietra is a master and teacher of traditional Venetian glassmaking techniques, and an artist who has helped shape the world of contemporary studio glass. He creates work known for its exceptional complexity, elegance, and visual poetry. In this podcast, Tagliapietra talks about blowing

Meet the Artist: Kait Rhoads and Amy Rueffert
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Kait Rhoads and Amy Rueffert represent a younger generation of artists who are working with glass in new ways. Rhoads, who innovatively and skillfully interprets traditional Italian techniques of murrine and filigrana in her vessels and wall panels, also makes "soft sculpture" out of cut

Meet the Artist: Debora Moore and Benjamin Moore
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Debora Moore, recipient of the Museum’s 2007 Rakow Commission, has worked with glass since the late 1980s and is best known for her complex studies of orchids, orchid trees and bamboo shoots. Debora’s husband, Benjamin Moore, is a studio glass pioneer, who has had an influential career as a teacher

Meet the Astronomer: Scott Kardel
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  Corning Museum of Glass, March 24, 2011 David Whitehouse: Good evening everyone and welcome to this opportunity to meet astronomer Scott Kardel of the Palomar Observatory. Eighty years ago, another astronomer, George Ellery Hale, thought big. Not content with observing the heavens through a

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